Freaconomic summary

Levitt seems to acknowledge this history, at least subtly: The first and longest chapter focuses on the role of incentives in human behavior. On average, children born in just after abortions became illegal display better educational and labor market achievements than children born prior to the change.

There are no subheadings within chapters, and in fact the material within each chapter blurs together, sometimes leaving the reader wondering how Levitt makes the leap from one topic to another. Statistically, the wrestler should have a slightly below even chance, since the wrestler is slightly better.

Legalized abortion and crime effect Revisiting a question first studied empirically in the s, Donohue and Levitt argue that the legalization of abortion can account for almost half of the reduction in crime witnessed in the s.

He gives an example of a day-care center faced with the problem that some parents were late picking up their children. McCrary stated "While municipal police force size does appear to vary over state and local electoral cycles As a result, aftermany women in impoverished communities had abortions where they would otherwise have had unwanted children.

Throughout the book, Levitt stresses that types of incentiveseconomic, social, and moraloften play off or replace one another. Dubner claimed that the results of Lott's research in More Guns, Less Crime had not been replicated by other academics. He states that he is taking economics back to its basics, as a study of incentives and the ways in which people attempt to get what they want, given that scarcity and competition exist.

In the campaign prior to the release of the book in Aprilpublisher William Morrow and Company chose to target bloggers in an unusually strategical way, sending galley copies to over a hundred of them, as well as contracting two specialized buzz marketing agencies.

There is an obvious economic incentive for teachers to cheat on the results of standardized tests, and in certain years, about five percent of teachers did cheat. Effects of extra police on crime[ edit ] Freakonomics claimed that it was possible to "tease out" the effect of extra police on crime by analysing electoral cycles.

Wade generation entered its twenties. Effects of extra police on crime[ edit ] Freakonomics claimed that it was possible to "tease out" the effect of extra police on crime by analysing electoral cycles. The authors posit that various incentives encourage teachers to cheat by assisting their students with multiple-choice high-stakes tests.

Studies have found that an unusually high number of sumo wrestlers with a record will defeat opponents with an record. From a pro-life view of the world: In Freakonomics, Levitt and Dubner argue that economics is, at root, the study of incentives.

There are no subheadings within chapters, and in fact the material within each chapter blurs together, sometimes leaving the reader wondering how Levitt makes the leap from one topic to another.

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything Summary

The first and longest chapter focuses on the role of incentives in human behavior. Introduction The book takes the form of six chapters. The book's chapters cover: Foote and Goetz, however, soon produced a rebuttal of their own and said that even after analyzing the data using the methods that Levitt and Donohue recommend, the data does not show a positive correlation between abortion rates and crime rates.

Freakonomics Radio Archive

Feldman asks company employees to leave a dollar for every bagel they eat. Even though foot soldiers had a one in four chance of being murdered, they continued to work for J.

The second child, Ted Kaczynski, grew up to be the Unabomber. This finding Freaconomic summary consistent with the view that children who were unwanted during pregnancy had worse socio-economic outcomes once they became adults. The socioeconomic patterns of naming children nominative determinism One example of the authors' use of economic theory involves demonstrating the existence of cheating among sumo wrestlers.

Levitt expands on this concept in an A final instance of cheating is the career of a man named Paul Feldman. The discussion of American crime continues in the fourth chapter, which is about the remarkable decline in crime in the s.

These incentives fall into three general categories: This is because urban, educated women were more likely to have abortions prior to the policy change, and the relative number of children born to this type of woman increased after the ban.

However, the bulk of this money went to a small number of leaders of drug gangs—the foot soldiers assumed almost all of the risk, in return for exceptionally small cuts of the profits.

Statistical analyses of naming trends suggest some surprising results. When the corrections were made, Foote and Goetz argued that abortion actually increased violent crime instead of decreasing it and did not affect property crime. The crack business, just like any other competitive business in America, is attractive to people because of its potential rewards.

In stepping outside what are commonly accepted as the boundaries of the field of economics, Levitt actually steps back a century or two into the past.

Discovering cheating as applied to teachers and sumo wrestlers, as well as a typical Washington DC area bagel business and its customers Chapter 2: The entire section is 1, words. The result was that parental tardiness increased; apparently, parents balanced the small fine against their own inconvenience in being on time and decided that the cost was worth it.

Since unwanted children have an unusually high probability of growing up to become criminals, Roe v.*Podcast ^One-hour special: Mashups of earlier podcasts, with updated material, which were once aired on the librariavagalume.come of On the Radio episodes.

†Marketplace segment: For three years, Freakonomics Radio appeared regularly on Marketplace, the weekday business program from American Public Media. Chapter 1 Summary. In Chapter 1, Freakonomics demonstrates how incentives affect human behavior.

As the book explains, economics is the study of incentives, which are ways to get people to do good rather than bad things. Freakonomics Summary Buy Study Guide Author Steven Levitt begins Freakonomics by brushing over some of the stories, questions, and ideas he will cover in the rest of the book, such as the s crime drop, information asymmetry, real estate agents, correlation vs.

causation, and, most importantly, incentives. Freakonomics Summary SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics.

Summary This chapter will answer the question, "What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common?" It begins with a story about a pair of economists who tried to find a solution for tardy parents who repeatedly.

Freakonomics - Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

In Freakonomics, journalist Stephen Dubner and economist Steven Levitt approach economics through the lens of the principal of incentives. This book showcases some of their most interesting.

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